Homework

2015/16 Tutorial Assignments
 
Home  Register  Log in  

Share | 
 

 Week 15 Homework Due Jan 5

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
ST_Tracy



Posts : 226
Join date : 2013-06-11

PostSubject: Week 15 Homework Due Jan 5   Mon 07 Dec 2015, 8:35 pm

Arrow IMPORTANT!!!!! Be sure you have a copy of Great Expectations by Charles Dickens when you come back to class on the 5th!!!!!

santa Your vocabulary quiz will be available on ClassMarker on Friday, Dec. 11 - Sunday, Dec 13. Be sure to take the quiz BEFORE MIDNIGHT on Sunday!!!


santa Finish the descriptive essay you started in class. Read it thoroughly for content. Be sure it flows and has good transitions. Make any corrections then email this first draft to me by Friday, the 11th. I will make suggestions and mark errors and email it back to you. Make necessary corrections then read AGAIN for grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors. Make corrections. Your final draft will be due on Jan. 5.

santa Write a 5 paragraph Literary Analysis Essay on Macbeth. This will be your final assignment on Macbeth. If you need further help with this assignment or aren't sure where to begin or what to include, scroll down this page. I have included guidelines and tips for writing a literary analysis as well as a sample of a good literary analysis essay.

santa Finally, have a very merry Christmas and I'll see you in the new year!! 



Writing a Literary Analysis Essay
The purpose of a literary analysis essay is to examine and evaluate a work of literature or an aspect of a work of literature. As with any analysis, this requires you to break the subject down into its component parts.
[list=margin-top:0in]
[*]Identify the author's purpose.  Ask yourself, what theme or main idea did the author want the reader to understand after he or she had finished reading?
[*]Think of the characters, tone, setting, rhythm, plot, imagery, etc. as devices or tools that help ensure that the reader "gets" the meaning that the writer intended him or her to learn.
[*]Ask yourself, why did the author choose to use these devices, in these particular ways?  How does this kind of character, plot event, or type of imagery help the reader understand the theme?
Remember, tell us how & why—don’t just summarize!
[/list]
 
Your objective in writing a literary analysis essay is to convince the person reading your essay that you have supported the claim you are developing. It MUST:
1. cover the topic you are writing about.
2. have a central idea (stated in your thesis) that shapes its development.
3. be organized so that every part contributes to the reader’s understanding of the claim
 
Create structure for your Essay with an OUTLINE
Paragraph 1: Hook, introduction, and thesis statement (your claim).
Developing a Claim
A strong literary analysis requires a central, controlling claim—the main argument you plan to support in your essay. Without a clear claim, the essay goes nowhere—it rambles, making points that seem unrelated. Review the quizzes that you have taken while reading the text. What strikes you as an interesting issue about the text? What idea do you keep thinking about or coming back to? Most likely, what interests you will interest your audience as well. Write your claim as a complete sentence, keeping in mind that you should state it in third person.
Paragraphs 2,3, & 4: support the central idea stated in your thesis with evidence from text.
Identify the author's purpose.  Ask yourself, what theme or main idea did the author want the reader to understand after he or she had finished reading? Think of the characters, tone, setting, rhythm, plot, imagery, etc. as devices or tools that help ensure that the reader "gets" the meaning that the writer intended him or her to learn. Ask yourself, why did the author choose to use these devices, in these particular ways?  How does this kind of character, plot event, or type of imagery help the reader understand the theme?  How would the piece be different if the author had chosen a different character, tone, or symbol?
Remember, tell us how & why—don’t just summarize!
 
 
Include cultural or historic perspective
Think about the cultural and historical perspectives of the piece. When a literary work was either written several years, decades, or even centuries ago, it is often easy for us to forget to place that particular piece of literature in a specific historical framework. It’s easy to overlook the fact that cultural and societal mores have changed.
 
Paragraph 5: Conclude by restating your thesis in different words. Leave your audience with a memorable thought, quote, etc.
Tips: Arranging your material to build your argument, you need to gather effective and appropriate evidence from the text to support your claim. Linking that evidence together as a chain is also important. Each paragraph takes one aspect of the total argument, supports it with details/evidence from the text, and offers the writer’s analysis of the point. Together, the paragraphs create a unified argument: each point builds on the previous one.
You may use any of the following types of  arrangement: · Chronological. · Comparison and contrast. · Least important to most important or most important to least important.
To begin, write the mini-claims you will need to make in each paragraph in order to build your argument. Then, consider the evidence from the text that you can use to support each mini-claim. Do you have any gaps without evidence? If so, search the text for anecdotes that bolster your claim.
 
 

Example of a Literary Analysis Essay:


Disappointment
      "The Story of an Hour" is a short story in which Kate Chopin, the author, presents an often unheard of view of marriage. Mrs. Louise Mallard, Chopin's main character, experiences the exhilaration of freedom rather than the desolation of loneliness after she learns of her husband's death. Later, when Mrs. Mallard learns that her husband, Brently, still lives, she know that all hope of freedom is gone. The crushing disappointment kills Mrs. Mallard. Published in the late eighteen hundreds, the oppressive nature of marriage in "The Story of an Hour" may well be a reflection of, though not exclusive to, that era.
      Though Chopin relates Mrs. Mallard's story, she does not do so in first person. Chopin reveals the story through a narrator's voice. The narrator is not simply an observer, however. The narrator knows, for example, that Mrs. Mallard, for the most part, did not love her husband (paragraph 15). It is obvious that the narrator knows more than can be physically observed. Chopin, however, never tells the reader what Mrs. Mallard is feeling. Instead, the reader must look into Mrs. Mallard's actions and words in order to understand what Mrs. Mallard feels.
      Mrs. Mallard is held back in her marriage. The lines of her face "bespoke repression" (paragraph Cool. When Mrs. Mallard learns of her husband's death, she knows that there will "be no powerful will bending her" (paragraph 14). There will be no husband who believes he has the "right to impose a private will upon a fellow creature" (paragraph 14). Mrs. Mallard acknowledges that her husband loved her. Brently had only ever looked at Mrs. Mallard with love (paragraph 13). This information implies to the reader that Brently is not a bad man; he simply believes that it is his right, and perhaps his obligation as a husband, to direct Mrs. Mallard in everything she does. When Mrs. Mallard learns of her husband's death, she realizes that he will no longer be there to repress her; there will be no one, save her, to direct her will. Then, in a crushing blow, everything she has just realized and begun to look forward to is stolen from her grasp.
      Upon learning of her husband's death, Mrs. Mallard realizes that she is now free. She repeats the words "Free, free, free!" (paragraph 11) and feels her body come alive. Her pulse beats faster; her blood runs warmer; her eyes brighten (paragraph 11). Mrs. Mallard knows that from now on she can live for herself and no one else, that "all sort of days…would be her own" (paragraph 19). Mrs. Mallard sees the chance to live out the rest of her days for herself; she sees the opportunity to be her own person. Mrs. Mallard now looks forward to a long life. She had previously dreaded the years ahead spent under the thumb of her husband (paragraph 19). Now, though, Mrs. Mallard is someone who has much to look forward to and many joys to appreciate. This opportunity is taken from her just as her chance of freedom is taken from her when she learns that Brently still lives. When Mrs. Mallard sees Brently walk through the front door, the disappointment and the devastation of loss that she suffers cause her heart to fail.
      When Mrs. Mallard walks down the stairs with her sister, she has triumph in her eyes (paragraph 20). The front door opens, however, and Brently walks in. What effect does this have on Mrs. Mallard? It kills her. Mrs. Mallard has, in a very short time, realized the world is a wonderful place and that she can live in it anyway she chooses. She gains freedom, independence, individuality, and a whole host of things to look forward to in life. When Brently walks in the door, though, Mrs. Mallard knows that she will have to spend the rest of her life as no more than his wife does, just as she had been. She knows that she will never be free. This is too much for Mrs. Mallard to handle. Life had been grim before, with her looking forward to the years ahead "with a shudder" (paragraph 19). Now that Mrs. Mallard has tasted what life might have been like without her husband, the idea of resuming her former life is unbearably grim. When Mrs. Mallard sees that her husband still lives, she dies, killed by the disappointment of losing everything she so recently thought she had gained.
Mrs. Louise Mallard experiences the exhilaration of freedom after she learns of her husband's death in "The Story of an Hour". Later, when Mrs. Mallard learns that her husband still lives, she know that all hope of freedom is gone. The crushing disappointment kills her. The oppressive nature of marriage in "The Story of an Hour" may well be a reflection of, though not exclusive to the late eighteen hundreds.

santa rendeer rendeer rendeer rendeer rendeer rendeer rendeer rendeer
Back to top Go down
 
Week 15 Homework Due Jan 5
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Homework :: Language Arts :: Advanced Writing-
Jump to: